Skip Navigation
Sebago Maine Town Seal
This table is used for column layout.
 
Growth and Development
ORDERLY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

In the period from 1990 through 1999, Sebago saw a net population increase of 174 persons, and issued over 119 new home permits, not counting replacements. Since 2000, the pace of growth has accelerated. Between 2000 and late 2004, the Town issued permits for 116 permits for new dwellings, not counting replacements. In an effort to maintain orderly growth, it is important to develop a Land Use Ordinance which will encourage future development in growth areas and discourage growth in rural areas. This should be done in part through strategies allowing higher densities in growth areas and much lower densities in rural areas.

Excluding areas that are constrained by natural or cultural factors, there are about 3,700 developable acres in town.  The acreage anticipated to be developed in the next 10 years is about five percent of this area.  Most prime lakefront land has already been built upon; therefore, most future development will occur inland.

Residents feel strongly that future development should be of a small scale that is compatible with Sebago’s rural character.  They believe that any additional commercial development should be in areas already supporting business, such as East Sebago, and prefer small enterprises to large ones.

Both survey results indicate that the majority of respondents would like to see a “slow” growth rate in the next ten years. Forty-nine percent believe that the traditional single family home should be permitted anywhere in town, and a majority feel there should be at least some location control over all other forms of land use. Land uses that to many people symbolize overdevelopment, rapid growth or unconstrained resource exploitation such as condominiums, large shopping centers, clear cut lumbering, mobile home parks, and most forms of industry were especially opposed.

It is not expected that there will be much growth in commercial development; any that occurs probably will be small in scale because of the limited local market and local opposition to large commercial developments. Industrial development is constrained by geographic factors, lack of public water or sewerage, and local opposition. Residential development will most likely continue to predominate.

Areas where careful resource management will be most important include the Sebago Lake watershed, shoreland zones, along ponds and streams, the Northwest River corridor, prime agricultural lands, and visually sensitive hilltops and areas bordering roads.

Goals:    To encourage orderly growth and development in appropriate areas of Sebago, while protecting the Town’s rural character, making efficient use of public services and preventing development sprawl.





Policies
Strategies
Responsibility/Date

1.      Growth and rural Areas.  Draft and adopt a land use ordinance that will allow orderly growth and protect natural and cultural resources, and rural character. Include growth areas (Village and Rural Residential) and rural areas (Rural).


A.      Land Use Ordinance.  Develop a Land Use Ordinance.


B.      Village District. Include in the Land Use Ordinance, Village Districts, defined as those areas judged to be of current or expected above-average growth with some possibility of commercial development, as approximately shown on the Future Land Use Map and to be fully defined at the enacting of the Land Use Ordinance.

·       Allow a range of residential, home occupation, small-scale commercial, public and institutional uses.
·       Lot size to be 40,000 square feet (30,000 square feet if part of a planned unit development that includes loop roads and preservation of open space or if 10% of units are affordable; 80,000 if commercial; for multi-family dwellings, 40,000 square feet for the first unit, and 20,000 square feet for each additional unit)
·       Road frontage to be 100 feet
·       Road setbacks to be 50 feet
·       Shore frontage to be 150 feet
·       Side and rear setbacks to be 15 feet
·       Restrict incompatible uses in primarily residential neighborhoods. Such uses include activities which generate traffic and noise greater than that associated with residential neighborhoods.
·       Establish size limits for commercial structures at 4,000 square feet.









C.      Rural Residential District. Include in the Land Use Ordinance, Rural Residential Districts, defined as those areas judged to be of current or expected average residential growth, as approximately shown on the Future Land Use Map, and to be fully defined at the enacting of the Land Use Ordinance.

·       Allow a range of residential and home occupation and public uses.
·       Lot size to be 60,000 square feet (40,000 square feet if part of a planned unit development that includes loop roads and preservation of open space or if 10% of units are affordable; for multi-family dwellings, 60,000 square feet for the first unit, and 20,000 square feet for each additional unit)
·       Road frontage to be 150 feet
·       Road setbacks to be 75 feet
·       Side and rear setbacks to be 15 feet

D.      Rural District. Include in the Land Use Ordinance a Rural District, as shown on the Future Land Use Map, to apply to all land areas not otherwise in the Village or Rural Residential District.

·       Allow single family dwellings, rural and open space uses including timber harvesting and agriculture
·       Lot size to be three acres
·        Road frontage to be 200 feet on State-numbered highways, 150 feet on all other roads.
·       Road setbacks to be 150 feet on State-numbered highways, 75 feet on all other roads.
·       Side and rear setbacks to be 15 feet.

E.   Growth Cap.  Allow for a growth cap for all districts.

Planning Board/Town/
2007

Planning Board/Town/
2007



























Planning Board/Town/
2007















Planning Board/Town/
2007
















2.      Rural Development. Limit the rate and extent of development in rural areas, and encourage the preservation of open space in new developments.

A.      Open space preservation incentive. Include language in the Land Use and Subdivision Ordinances to allow lot sizes in new developments in the Rural District to be reduced from 3 acres to 2 acres, provided that at least 30% of the net residential acreage in small subdivisions (five lots or less) and at least 40% in large subdivisions (6 or more lots) is preserved as open space.

B.      Rural area building cap. Adopt a growth cap for the Rural District (recommend an annual limit of 10), and include provisions to: 1) limit the number of permits that any individual or corporation can receive on an annual basis, and 2) allow exemptions for structure replacements and gift lots. Periodically adjust the rate to 30% to 35% of the average annual number of permits granted during the past five years.


Planning Board/Town/
2007





Planning Board/Town/
2007



3.      Development location. Allow future development only in areas that can be serviced conveniently and economically by the Town and that are environmentally suitable for the scale of the development.

A.      Open space.  Add provisions to the Subdivision Ordinance and Site Plan Review Ordinance, in addition to the open space preservation incentive above, to encourage designs that preserve open space.

B.      Municipal impact. Add provisions to the Subdivision Ordinance and Site Plan Review Ordinance to require all development proposals to include information detailing their impact on municipal facilities and services, as well as criteria to minimize such impacts.


C.      Public road access. Include in the Subdivision Ordinance a requirement that where public roads or access are not adequate to serve the needs of the subdivision, developers should be required to upgrade the road and/or access.

D.      Abandoned or discontinued roads.  Review the status of abandoned or discontinued roads to ensure that the Town does not unknowingly incur road-building liabilities because of future subdivision development.

E.      Site plan review.  Continue to regulate multi-family and non-residential development through the provisions of the Site Plan Review Ordinance.  Include additional standards for open space preservation, surface water drainage, topographic and architectural compatibility, ground water protection, sewage disposal, outdoor storage areas, lighting, emergency vehicle access, waste disposal, protection of scenic areas and height restrictions.

F.      Impact fees.  Develop an impact fee ordinance to help offset the public costs of new development.

Planning Board/Town/
2007


Planning Board/Town/
2007




Planning Board/Town/
2007



Planning Board/Town/
2007



Planning Board/Town/
2007





Selectmen/Town departments, boards and committees/2007


4.      Growth monitoring. Monitor growth and develop and, where necessary, recommend additional ordinance provisions aimed at guiding and controlling growth.
A.      Evaluation. Evaluate, on a biennial basis, the patterns of growth occurring in Sebago to determine whether there is a balance between growth occurring in growth and rural areas.  If Sebago’s Land Use Ordinance appears to be ineffective in guiding growth and preserving rural character, or if Sebago’s rate of growth appears to be too rapid, or if other problems emerge, recommend ordinance changes to the voters of Sebago. Include in the evaluation the real or potential impact of seasonal conversions on the growth of the community, on water quality, and on the cost of providing community services. These changes may include, but are not limited to, one or more of the following:
·       A change in district boundaries;
·       A change in lot size requirements;
·       Limits on non-residential development; and/or
·       Other growth management techniques which have been demonstrated to be effective in other communities in managing growth.
Planning Board/ Ongoing



















5.  Plan implementation.  Ensure           that the comprehensive plan is implemented on a continuing basis.

A.      Implementation. Establish an implementation committee to oversee implementation of the comprehensive plan.

Selectmen/2006




6.      Curb cuts and driveway locations. Limit curb cuts and driveway locations along major roads.

A.      Access management standards. Include access management standards in the Subdivision and Land Use Ordinances for Routes 114 and 107 that are at least as strict as and consistent with the State’s access management standards.

B.      Shared driveways. Include a requirement in the Subdivision and Land Use Ordinances for shared driveways.

Planning Board/ Ongoing


Planning Board/ Ongoing